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State of the States (SOTS) Infrastructure
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BACKGROUND

CORE COMPONENTS

SIGNIFICANT, TIMELY, & RELEVANT FINDINGS

ABOUT SOTS

INFRASTRUCTURE


SURVEILLANCE

PROGRAM & POLICY STRATEGIES

PARTNERSHIPS

COMMUNICATION

TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE


COMPLETE 2015 SOTS REPORT

COMPLETE 2013 SOTS REPORT


COMPLETE 2011 SOTS REPORT




 

INFRASTRUCTURE

 

Infrastructure refers to the basic physical and organizational “building blocks” that make it possible for a state injury and violence prevention (IVP) program to function. 

 

 

Types of Funding Sources

 

In 2015, nearly $90 million was invested in state IVP programs among the 39 states that responded to this survey item.

  • This is an average of $2.3 million per state program (median of $1.6 million, ranging from $18,000 to $9.7 million).
  • Investments in state IVP programs come from a variety of funding sources, including federal agencies, state governments, non-profit organizations, and foundations.

Funding Source Types Awarded to State IVP Programs, 2015

 

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State and National Funding Per Capita 

 

One person dies in the US every three minutes from injury,1 however millions of individuals experience injuries and survive. Lifetime medical and work loss costs due to injury and violence in the United States are $671 billion,1,2 or $2116 per person.3

 

 

Across respondents, states spent an average of only $0.68 per person with funding levels ranging from as low as $0.02 per person up to $4.11 per person. but still represent a small fraction of public health investments.

State Health Department IVP Funding per Capita, 2015

 

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Allocation of State Health Department IVP Funding

 

To make the greatest possible impact on their communities, state IVP programs must strategically invest their resources.

  • Public health practitioners are critical to the success of IVP programs, and this importance is reflected in the 2015 funding allocations, with personnel receiving the greatest proportion of funds across funding categories ($32.9 million, 37%).
  • Funds to expand the reach of the IVP program beyond the walls of the state health department accounted for the next two largest categories of spending: grants, mini-grants, and contracts to support local programs ($21.2 million, 24%), and external contractors and consultants ($15.9 million, 18%).

 

Allocation of State Health Department IVP Funding, 2015

 

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IVP Workforce

  • A total of 432 individuals worked in 39 state IVP programs in 2015.
  • Of these individuals, 329 (76%) were full-time or part-time paid staff, 55 (13%) were full-time or part-time contractors, and the remaining 48 (11%) worked in other capacities.
  • State programs had a median of 6.0 FTEs and an average of 8.4 FTEs, with values ranging from 0.3 to 26.59 FTEs.
  • Forty-one percent of states had 5.0 FTES or less in their IVP program, 35.9% had between 6.0 and 15.0 FTEs, and the remaining 23.1% had more than 16.0 FTEs.
  • Nearly 211 FTEs were supported by federal funds, followed by 113 by state funds and six by other funding sources.

Distribution of Primary Roles for FTEs, 2015

 

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1 Florence C, Simon T, Haegerich T, et al. Estimated Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Fatal Injuries — United States, 2013. [online] (2015) [accessed 2016 Oct 17].

2 Florence C, Simon T, Haegerich T, et al. Estimated Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Emergency Department–Treated Nonfatal Injuries — United States, 2013 [online] (2015) [accessed 2016 Oct 17].

3 United States Census Bureau. American Fact Finder [online] (2016) [accessed 2016 Oct 17].

 

 

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