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State of the States (SOTS) Program and Policy Strategies
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BACKGROUND

CORE COMPONENTS

SIGNIFICANT, TIMELY, & RELEVANT FINDINGS

ABOUT SOTS

INFRASTRUCTURE


SURVEILLANCE

PROGRAM & POLICY STRATEGIES

PARTNERSHIPS

COMMUNICATION

TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE


COMPLETE 2015 SOTS REPORT

COMPLETE 2013 SOTS REPORT


COMPLETE 2011 SOTS REPORT




 

PROGRAM AND POLICY STRATEGIES

 

To effectively change individual or group behaviors, public health professionals utilize two key types of interventions: policy-related and programmatic strategies. Policy strategies are those injury and violence prevention (IVP) efforts (administrative actions, incentives, resource allocations, etc.) that involve enacting, changing, or enforcing laws, regulations, procedures, or other voluntary practices of governments and other institutions.1 According to the Institute of Medicine,2,3 policy development is an essential public health function.

 

Strategies that involve providing equipment, services, and/or information to individuals or communities for a defined amount of time and with a specific goal in mind are classified as “programs” or programmatic interventions. Programs have been an effective cornerstone of IVP efforts for decades, helping to raise awareness and change individual or group behaviors.4

 

 

Program Strategies Focus Areas

  • States most commonly reported using programs to address fall injuries, unintentional poisoning/prescription drug overdose (PDO), sexual violence, child passenger safety, and suicide.
  • Thirty-four percent of states reported a primary focus on one or more motor vehicle injury areas (e.g., child passenger safety, teen driving, distracted driving, etc.). 
  • Compared to 2013, more states reported specifically allocating funding to support evaluation for the topic areas fall injuries (53%), sexual violence (48%), and unintentional poisoning/PDO (45%). 
  • Four of the five most common focus areas were determined by the information present in local, state, and national data. The exception was sexual violence prevention, for which funding directives were the primary method of determination.

 

Methods Used for Selecting the Top Five Injury and Violence Topic Areas, 2015

 

 

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Policy Strategy Focus Areas

  • In 2015, the majority of state IVP programs (94%, N=36) implemented policy strategies, including those strategies implemented in collaboration with partners.
  • The most common methods to inform policy that were used by state IVP programs in 2015 included:
    • Working to encourage adoption of original policies for IVP (61%)
    • Participating in boards and/or commissions (56%)
    • Working to increase public awareness of laws (56%)
    • Recommending health department positions on bills (54%) 
  • Policy strategies were most commonly used to address the following IVP topic areas: child passenger safety (54%), teen drivers (46%), unintentional poisoning/PDO (46%), and seat belts (41%). 

 

Policy Strategies Implemented by State IVP Programs, 2015

 

 

 

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Top Prevention Strategies by Topic

 

As noted above, the top three most commonly reported IVP focus areas were fall injuries, unintentional poisoning/PDO, and sexual violence. Top prevention strategies that were implemented for these most commonly reported IVP focus areas included:

 

Fall injuries

  • Exercise-based fall prevention program (e.g., Tai Chi) (80%)
  • Multi-faceted prevention program (e.g., Stepping On) (73%)
  • Policy that establishes commissions, coalitions, and/or programs (50%)
  • Clinical prevention interventions (50%)

 

Unintentional poisoning/prescription drug overdose (PDO)

  • Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (83%)
  • Other prescription drug-related policies (e.g., doctor shopping laws) (63%)

 

Sexual violence

  • Conduct training to prevent sexual violence and promote protective social norms (96%)
  • Teach healthy, safe dating and intimate relationships skills to adolescents (e.g., Safe Dates) (84%)
  • Teach skills to prevent sexual violence (e.g., Second Step) (64%)
  • Mobilize men and boys as allies (e.g., Men Can Stop Rape) (48%)

Degree of Focus for Top Three Most Commonly Reported IVP Topic Areas by State, 2015

 

 

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 1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of the Associate Director for Policy, Definition of Policy. [online] (2016) [accessed 2016 Oct 17].

2 Institute of Medicine (U.S.). The Future of Public Health. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 1988.

3 Institute of Medicine (U.S.). The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 2002.

4 Building Safer States: Core Components of State Public Health Injury and Violence Prevention Programs. (2013). Atlanta (GA): Safe States Alliance. [accessed 2016 Oct 17].


 


 

 

 

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