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Trauma Center IVP Standards and Indicators FAQ
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Frequently Asked Questions and Answers:

Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II

Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention

Programs

 

The Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs is the first to outline the five, consensus-based core components of a model injury and violence prevention (IVP) within Level I and II trauma centers. Each core component: leadership, resources, data, effective interventions, and partnerships; is accompanied by a set of voluntary standards and indicators to guide the design and implementation of a model IVP program. 

 

The guidance offers programs at all levels ideas on how their programs could be expanded or strengthened, while also providing concrete, consensus-based descriptions of what constitutes a model program — one more likely to deliver the shared goals of reducing the burden and costs of injury and violence in communities across the United States.

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAQs

 

Why are the model standards and indicators focused on Level I and Level II trauma center injury and violence prevention programs?

Many hospitals, regardless of their trauma level, conduct injury and violence prevention (IVP) activities and may find the Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs useful to their work. However, based on guidance provided in the Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient (Orange Book), only Level I and Level II trauma centers are required to have an injury prevention professional on staff and implement at least two programmatic interventions that address a major cause of injury in their communities. Despite these requirements and ongoing independent efforts, little specific direction is in place to help programs move beyond minimum requirements to design model programs, with consistent characteristics.

 

This voluntary set of standards and indicators is a first step towards providing guidance on the design and implementation of a model IVP program for Level I and Level II trauma center IVP programs. The report provides guidance on how Level I and II trauma center IVP programs can move along a continuum to meet the standards for model, mature programs, recognizing all programs have opportunities for improvement.

 

Who was responsible for creating the Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs?

The Safe States Alliance, a member of the Trauma Prevention Coalition, received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) to conduct activities in support of strengthening Trauma Center IVP programs with a goal of improving alignment and collaboration with public health efforts. To accomplish this, Safe States convened a trauma prevention steering committee and hired a contracting firm to conduct an environmental scan, facilitate stakeholder roundtables, and disseminate a national survey for trauma injury prevention professionals. 

 

The standards and indicators are reflective of several earlier efforts that address components of trauma center and/or public health IVP programs. These include:

With guidance from the trauma prevention steering committee, stakeholders were engaged to build consensus and establish the core components and associated standards and indicators of a model Level I and Level II trauma center IVP program.

 

How were the core components and associated standards and indicators determined?

To better understand the current state of trauma center-based injury and violence prevention (IVP) programs, we employed multiple approaches to collect and distill information related to IVP programs based within Level I and II trauma centers.

 

The recommendations in the Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs reflect the following efforts:

  • Feedback from public health IVP representatives and trauma center IVP professionals obtained through:
    • Steering committee discussions/guidance
    • Key informant interviews
    • Environmental Scan (February 2017)
    • Two stakeholder roundtable meetings (March and September 2017)
  • Results from an online survey related to the five core components: leadership, resources, data, interventions, and partnerships; of trauma center IVP professionals from across the United States (June and July 2017)

Key findings obtained through the national survey of Level I and II trauma center IVP professionals affirmed the need for consistent standards and indicators reflected in the report.

 

What is the intended use of the Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs?

The standards and indicators describe what would exist in a model Level I or II trauma center IVP program. These standards and indicators, with associated examples, are not inclusive; instead, they represent voluntary actions meant to help a trauma center IVP program review its current efforts and identify potential areas for strengthening the program and for future growth. Likewise, all standards may not be appropriate or applicable to all programs.

 

What is the potential impact of the Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs for the field?

This new resource is intended to support the injury and violence prevention (IVP) professional and hospital leadership with tangible ideas for expanding or strengthening programs at all levels, moving beyond minimum requirements. It is the first to provide concrete, consensus-based descriptions of what constitutes a model Level I or II trauma center IVP program — one more likely to deliver the shared goals of reducing the burden and costs of injury and violence in communities across the United States.

 

It is our hope that these voluntary, consensus-based components and associated standards and indicators will inform the development of future guidance and requirements set by the American College of Surgeons and others for trauma center IVP programs. Furthermore, the key findings and guidance within this resource presents an opportunity to increase alignment and strengthen collaboration between trauma centers and public health.

 

Is the Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs final; will there be revisions?

The Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs reflects the consensus-based findings obtained from trauma center and public health injury and violence (IVP) professionals from across the country through a series of stakeholder meetings, interviews, and an online survey. It builds on several earlier efforts that address components of trauma center and/or public health IVP programs. These include:

This report is intended to be a first iteration for strengthening Level I and II trauma center IVP programs and increasing their alignment with public health practice. Recognizing the practice of injury and violence prevention is not stagnant, we expect that future revisions will be made. 

 

How is this guidance applicable to a local or state public health program?

The key findings and guidance within the Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs present an opportunity to increase alignment and strengthen collaboration between trauma centers and public health. This resource provides Level I and II trauma center injury and violence prevention (IVP) programs with a set of characteristics for developing a model program consistent with public health practice.

Public health practitioners play an important role in the communities where trauma centers operate. Based on the findings from our survey of Level I and II trauma center IVP programs, the following opportunities for local and state public health partners exist:

  • Assistance with collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and using qualitative and quantitative data;
  • Support for program planning and evaluation;
  • Providing ongoing or continuing education training for the IVP professional;
  • Providing information and access to the best available evidence; and
  • Convening partners to collaboratively address community needs. 

 

Have other questions on the Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center Injury and Violence Prevention Programs?

We have a panel of trauma center and public health injury and violence prevention professionals ready to answer your questions and consider your feedback. Please submit additional questions or comments about the Standards and Indicators for Model Level I and II Trauma Center IVP Programs to TraumaIVP@safestates.org.

 

Additional Training on the Standards and Indicators

Safe States and NACCHO hosted a webinar to share additional background on the development of the Standards and Indicators and key findings. An expert panel of trauma injury and violence prevention professionals discussed its use and implications for the field.

 

View the webinar

  

Want to Help with Future Efforts? Join the Safe States Hospital Injury Prevention Special Interest Group

The purpose of this Special Interest Group is to provide a forum for Safe States members with experience in hospital trauma to express ideas, learn of best practices, and contribute to expert discussions with peers and colleagues. It is also a great way to stay informed about current developments and build a network of professional contacts in this field. 

 

Interested in joining the Hospital Injury Prevention Special Interest GroupClick here for more information      

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