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Behavior Change Strategies for Risky Driving
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HOW TO USE THIS RESOURCE

PUBLIC HEALTH APPROACH

BACKGROUND

KEY DEFINITIONS

SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL MODEL FOR DRIVER SAFETY

SHARED RISK FACTORS

SHARED PROTECTIVE FACTORS

BEHAVIOR CHANGE STRATEGIES

RECOMMENDATIONS


APPENDIX A: PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION GUIDE

 

APPENDIX B: EXPLORING KEY FACTORS FOR RISKY DRIVING


COMPLETE RESOURCE DOCUMENT




 

Traditional programs and efforts to reduce motor vehicle-related injuries and fatalities have been directly linked to specific risky driving outcomes (e.g., sobriety checkpoints to reduce alcohol-impaired driving). It is important for traffic safety and public health professionals to understand how to identify strategies that can affect shared factors – ultimately, preventing injuries and fatalities across risky driving behaviors.

 

Many of the risk and protective factors noted on the previous pages require strategies and partnerships beyond those historically used to prevent motor vehicle-related injuries and fatalities. One key consideration when selecting a new intervention or a new countermeasure practice is assessing how well it will work to create the outcome of interest. For this reason, it is important for traffic safety and public health injury prevention professionals to seek out strategies that have been shown to be effective in order to maximize their benefit. Many of the costs to implement strategies that address shared risk and protective factors can be justified from both traffic safety and public health funding sources, which allows partners to combine and share funding in order to pursue a common goal. 

 

The table below provides a set of terms and criteria used to distinguish among levels of evidence. These terms clarify how strategies are categorized so that users understand the strength of evidence used to determine the “level of effectiveness” for suggested strategies.

 

Click on the image below to download a clickable PDF of the table.

 

Where possible, strategies with the strongest evidence base should be used. However, there may be circumstances that require the use of promising or emerging strategies. The use of promising or emerging strategies can be helpful to grow and expand the evidence-base in the field.  It is important to note that strategies with no evidence base or those that have been proven as ineffective should not be used.  

 

The table of strategies below includes a wide variety of effective, promising, and emerging strategies that can address the risk factors and protective factors associated with the six risky driving behaviors. However, it is not an all-encompassing or exhaustive list 

 

Strategies highlighted in green are considered “effective.” Strategies that are highlighted in yellow are considered “promising.” Strategies that are highlighted in blue are considered “emerging.” 

 

Click on the table below to access the full listing of strategies.

 

Some interventions will need to be broader in nature in order to reach entire groups or populations, such as schools, neighborhoods, or the workplace. Examples include educational campaigns highlighting the dangers of behaviors like texting or driving impaired.  Others will need to be more selective in addressing behavioral issues. Examples include prevention education for parents of teenagers on safe driving practices or support groups for adults with a history of trauma or substance use disorders. Finally, targeted preventive interventions are needed for persons who show signs of being at risk for unsafe driving behaviors. These interventions include direct referrals to support services for substance use associated with impaired driving or counseling for post-traumatic therapy. 

 

 
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